Tag: you

Calling All Cars: Alibi / Broken Xylophone / Manila Envelopes







The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.

The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.

Due to Dragnet’s popularity, LAPD Chief Parker “became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation”. In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show’s previous mainstay.

Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.

The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD’s most famous “cold case”, and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film’s characters (from the 1950s) “represent the choices ahead for the LAPD”: assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a “straight arrow” approach.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth







Planet Earth is this solid thing you are standing on right now. In your everyday life you don’t really waste a thought about how amazing this is. A giant, ancient, hot rock. How did it come into existence and how big is it really? You will be surprised. The ground you are standing on is just a very, very small part of the big picture.

THANK YOU FOR AN AWESOME YEAR YOUTUBE! 😀

Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h

Steady: https://steadyhq.com/de/kurzgesagt
Merchandise:  https://shop.kurzgesagt.org
Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cRUQxz
Facebook: http://bit.ly/1NB6U5O
Twitter: http://bit.ly/2DDeT83
Instagram: http://bit.ly/2DEN7r3
Discord: https://discord.gg/cB7ycdv

The Voice of Kurzgesagt:
Steve Taylor: http://voice-pool.com/en/english/

Thomas who makes our MUSIC has his own company now!! So if you want music as awesome as ours or just take a look at the music from the last videos, here is Thomas’ new website and his soundcloud at & epic-mountain.com & soundcloud.com/epicmountain.

Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe.
We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful.

THANKS A LOT TO OUR PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US:

Justin Degenaars
Opal Hartbower
jordan gardner
Jeff Le
Devir Islas
Scott Zell
Jeroen Koerts
Derek Loa
Chris Kitching
Tony Morley
Tanya Smirnova
Patrick Eyrich
J.J.
Chris Linardos
Dean Herbert
Adam Primaeros
Rory Bennett
Gaëtan Duvaux
Rasmus Lind
Caroline Andrewes
Deanie Adams
Chris Dudley
Alex Kaplan
KokLiang Lim
Alexander Law McCormack Heavens
Chris Doughty
Dario Pagnia
Sara Shah
Eduardo Barbosa
Ghitea Andrei Paul
Neve Laughery
Eliud Vasquez
Maximilian Heitsch
Sebastian Laiseca
Alejandro Liechty
David Davenport-Firth
Janne Jaukkuri
Pascal B.
Brandon Liu
Tim
Justin T.
Daniel O.C.L.
Leigh Thompson
Heemi Kutia
Valerie Brunet
somersault18:24
Javier de la Garza
Peter Žnuderl
Randy Knapp
Benoît Graham
Jeff Churchill
Jonathan Velazquez Gore
Daniel
Pol Lutgen
Seona Tea
Daniel Fuchs
Thomas Lee
Finn Edwards
Petr Pilař
Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef
Fabricio Godoy
Charles Kuang
Maximilian Ritter
Yousif
Jesse Powell
Peter Wagner
Igor Benicio de Mesquita
Siddharth Bajaj
Greeny Liu
Tibor Schiemann
dante harper
Bünyamin Tetik
Stephen Morse
Evan Low
Dario *Liquid TLO* Wünsch
Matthew Macomber
Evan
Ziggy Freed
Chase Gotlieb
Brian David Henderson

Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth

Help us caption & translate this video!

http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2

Calling All Cars: The Wicked Flea / The Squealing Rat / 26th Wife / The Teardrop Charm







The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.

The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.

Due to Dragnet’s popularity, LAPD Chief Parker “became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation”. In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show’s previous mainstay.

Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.

The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD’s most famous “cold case”, and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film’s characters (from the 1950s) “represent the choices ahead for the LAPD”: assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a “straight arrow” approach.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Calling All Cars: I Asked For It / The Unbroken Spirit / The 13th Grave







The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.

The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.

Due to Dragnet’s popularity, LAPD Chief Parker “became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation”. In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show’s previous mainstay.

Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.

The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD’s most famous “cold case”, and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film’s characters (from the 1950s) “represent the choices ahead for the LAPD”: assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a “straight arrow” approach.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Calling All Cars: Missing Messenger / Body, Body, Who's Got the Body / All That Glitters







The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California.

The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption.

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.

The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.

Due to Dragnet’s popularity, LAPD Chief Parker “became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation”. In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show’s previous mainstay.

Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.

The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD’s most famous “cold case”, and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film’s characters (from the 1950s) “represent the choices ahead for the LAPD”: assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a “straight arrow” approach.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

What Is Life? Is Death Real?







So what is the difference between you and a rock? This seems like an easy, even stupid question. But even the smartest people on earth have no idea where to draw the line between living and dead things. Which leads to mind-blowing implications. What is life after all? And is death really a thing? Lets look into it together

http://waitbutwhy.com/ has the follow up article up: http://bit.ly/1vJBzCU Have I mentionend yet that you should read it? Check them out, by far the best blog on the internet.

Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h

Steady: https://steadyhq.com/de/kurzgesagt
Merchandise:  https://shop.kurzgesagt.org
Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cRUQxz
Facebook: http://bit.ly/1NB6U5O
Twitter: http://bit.ly/2DDeT83
Instagram: http://bit.ly/2DEN7r3
Discord: https://discord.gg/cB7ycdv

The Voice of Kurzgesagt:
Steve Taylor: http://voice-pool.com/en/english/

You can get the MUSIC of the video here:

http://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/life
http://epic-mountain.com

What Is Life? Is Death Even Real?

THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US:

Opal Hartbower, Andrzej Rejman, Andrew Jagasothy, Russell Common, Stephen Bassett, Christopher Lang, Chris Kitching, Jeff Le, Francesca Monteiro, Duncan Cheong, Derek, Juan Manuel Corredor, Kyle Chapman, Lam Nguyen, Jan Berdel, Scott Zell, David Walsh, AgentK, Mehmet Sevil, Carly Tawse, Shaalee Dworski, Ben Nunan, J.J., Chris Linardos, Tony Morley Jónatan Nilsson, Pholpat Durongbhan, Mosh Rahman, Patrick Eyrich, KokLiang Lim, trefmanic, Dean Herbert, Adam Smith, Gaëtan Duvaux, Caroline Andrewes, Alex Kaplan, Sebastian Laiseca, Chase Gotlieb, Matthew Gill, Alexander Heavens, Kevin Yapaola, Adam Primaeros, Jan Schmid, Alexander Gavin Zodda, Dario Pagnia, Sara Shah, Kimberly Powell, Eduardo Barbosa, Jeroen Koerts, Michal, Will B, maarten ligtenberg, Ghitea Andrei Paul, nga⁴, Ryan, Larry Bunyard, Malthe Agger, Giovanna Cardoso, dante harper, Bünyamin Tetik, Joe Pond, Stephen Morse, Jørgen Smalås, Dario Wünsch, Matthew Macomber, Daniel McCouid-Carr, Ziggy Freed, Brian David Henderson, Theo Alves Monteiro, David Davenport-Firth, Hamad, Michael Ren, Andrew Connor, Peter Schuller, Brandy Alexander, Alexander Kosenkov, Pascal B., Eric, Scott Laing, Gizem Gürkan, George Chearswat, Brandon Liu, oscar gautama, Tim, Bruno Araújo, Carlos Bohorquez, Christian Lyster Blæsbjerg, Daniel OCL, David Harbinson, Heemi Kutia, Rikard Nyberg, Florian Guitton, Jezariael Demos, Ajay Shekhar, Ryan Nai, Eugene Cham, Nick Yonge, David Garcia Quintas, Renaud Savignard, James, Ryan, somersault18:24, Pranab Shenoy, Terry Lipstein, Jan Lukas Lehmann, Javier de la Garza, Tim Carll, Peter Žnuderl, Rory Bennett, Sieglinde Geisel, Randy Knapp, Jeff Churchill, Jonathan Velazquez Gore, Daniel, Roman Zolotorevich, Clayton Fussell. Pol Lutgen, Daniel Gonzalez, Stephen Joseph DCruz, Seona Tea, Thomas Lee, Finn Edwards, Ernst van Wijk, David Taylor, Corbin Greene, Tempest, Balazs-Hegedus Jozsef, Alan Feyaerts, Fabricio Godoy, Charles Kuang, Maximilian Ritter, Jesse MacLean, Yousif, Jesse Powell, Wei Wong, Praveen Muthu, Jon Davis, Bahjat, Etienne La Count, Igor Benicio de Mesquita, Siddharth Bajaj, Greeny Liu, Processed Refund, Tibor Schiemann,

What Is Life? Is Death Even Real?

Help us caption & translate this video!

http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2

Our Miss Brooks: Mash Notes to Harriet / New Girl in Town / Dinner Party / English Dept. / Problem







Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952–56), it became one of the medium’s earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name.

Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School.
Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show’s first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series’ run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school–such as that for prom queen–so that his daughter Harriet would win.
Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks’ references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show’s running gags.
Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks’ affections.
Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks’ absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts.
Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father’s malevolence and dishonesty.
Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter’s best friend.
Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks.
Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher.

Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role.

Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn’t audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script–Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal–Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try.

Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very “feline” in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast–blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright–also received positive reviews.

Arden won a radio listeners’ poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. “I’m certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you’ve bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton,” she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year’s best radio comedienne.

For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks

Calling All Cars: Crime v. Time / One Good Turn Deserves Another / Hang Me Please







The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California.

The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption.

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.

The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.

Due to Dragnet’s popularity, LAPD Chief Parker “became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation”. In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show’s previous mainstay.

Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.

The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD’s most famous “cold case”, and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film’s characters (from the 1950s) “represent the choices ahead for the LAPD”: assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a “straight arrow” approach.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Fat Burning Diets – 12 Foods That Help You Burn More Fat.mp4







http://totalabsfitness.com 12 Fat Burning Diet Foods That Burn More Fat

Having a healthy eating plan won’t make you lose weight overnight will give you the best chance of losing stubborn belly fat and boosting your metabolism.

Below you’ll find 12 fat burning foods that you can add to any diet and exercise program to help you burn more fat in less time.

These healthy and delicious foods will help you feel more full, boost your energy levels, speed your metabolism and aid your body’s digestive system

These 15 fat burning foods are also full of vitamins and nutrients to help fuel your body.

A few of the foods on the list even contains special enzymes that provides an extra boost to your metabolism.

1. Avocados.

Research shows that avocados are high in healthy monounsaturated fats, and help control your appetite, regulate hormones, and keep your heart healthy

2. Oats

Oatmeal is known to reduce high cholesterol, but its also a complex carbohydrate, that slowly breaks down in the body, which keeps you feeling full longer and gives you more energy all day long.

3. Asparagus

Asparagus is high in nutrients and helps flush the body which removes unwanted fat deposits and toxins.

4. Almonds

Almonds are full of high protein and fiber. Eating almonds throughout the day helps appease your hunger and add nutrients to your daily diet.

5. Spinach

This leafy green vegetable is low in calories but rich in fiber, iron and beta-carotene, which helps lower cholesterol.

6. Green tea

Unlike coffee, the caffeine in green tea doesn’t increase metabolism, instead its a chemical called EGCG, which stimulates the brain and nervous system a boost, which in turn increases the amount of caloriesyou need to process the green tea

7. Broccoli

Filled with great sources of vitamins A and C, broccoli contains a ton of fiber that will make you feel full and keeps you regular. to get the greatest benefits eat it raw.

8. Walnuts

Eating a handful of walnuts before a meal not only helps you from overeating, but it also gives you a healthy dose of fiber, vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids to reduce bad cholesterol.

9. Apples

Available in many different varieties apples are rich in vitamins and fiber to help keep you feeling full.

10. Milk

Although there are many different opinions on the consumption of milk and dairy products, one thing is clear: milk is rich in calcium which is good for your body. It’s also contains a large proportion of complex carbohydrates, which gives you more energy. Many nutritionists recommend that you drink skim milk if you can and avoid soy milk

11. Grapefruits

Grapefruits contains galacturonic acid, which breaks down fat, while the fiber helps keeps you feeling full.

12. Pineapples

This fruit is rich in fiber and vitamin C, and also contains bromelain, an enzyme that helps the body to process protein quickly. Even though the pineapple is very nutritious, it also naturally contains a lot of sugar so eat in moderation

Calling All Cars: The Flaming Tick of Death / The Crimson Riddle / The Cockeyed Killer







The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California.

The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption.

The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.

The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.

Due to Dragnet’s popularity, LAPD Chief Parker “became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation”. In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show’s previous mainstay.

Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.

The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD’s most famous “cold case”, and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film’s characters (from the 1950s) “represent the choices ahead for the LAPD”: assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a “straight arrow” approach.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD